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tinkerBOY DPI Adapter v1.0: Gettting Started Guide

Edit the config.txt and copy/paste the following lines:

Save the file.

The tinkerBOY DPI Adapter v1.0 uses a custom overlay for the DPI interface. Download this file, unzip and place the dpi18_666.dtbo file inside the overlays folder in the boot partition of the sdcard where the config.txt is also located.

That’s it for the settings.

Guides:

 

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RetroPie: Disable Builtin Sound Card and Enable USB Audio Only

Edit the file /boot/config.txt and comment the line:

#dtparam=audio=on

Now edit the file /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-blacklist.conf and add:

blacklist snd_bcm2835

Finally edit the file /lib/modprobe.d/aliases.conf and comment the line:

#options snd-usb-audio index=-2

Or if you just want the USB Audio to be your primary sound device.

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RetroPie: Testing The USB Controller/Joystick Via The Command Line or Terminal

Let’s start by connecting to your Raspberry Pi/RetroPie either by SSH or just plug a keyboard and hit F4 to go directly to the Terminal.

Check if your USB controller is detected by:

lsusb

Mine is “Arduino SA Leonardo”.

Next, enter the following command to test the inputs:

jstest /dev/input/js0

Now press each of the configured button inputs and you should get a response.

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RetroPie SDCard Image with Built-in GPIO Controller Support

Below is a modified copy of RetroPie 4.3 image for the Raspberry Pi Zero with built-in support for setting up GPIO buttons using Adafruit’s Retrogame utility program. I have tested it and have been using it for my Game Boy Zero builds.

Raspberry Pi Zero – RetroPie_4.3_GPIO_PiZero.img.7z (578Mb)

Just edit the file /boot/retrogame.cfg to match your GPIO configuration.

Or use the following GPIO soldering setup:

 UP  –  GPIO04
 DOWN  –  GPIO17
 LEFT  –  GPIO27
 RIGHT  –  GPIO22
 A  –  GPIO05
 B  –  GPIO06
 X  –  GPIO19
 Y  –  GPIO26
 SELECT  –  GPIO20
 START  –  GPIO16
 L1  –  GPIO12
 R1  –  GPIO23

PWM audio is configured to use GPIO18 and GPIO13 by default but you can edit the following lines in the /boot/config.txt to either enable 1 or 2 audio channel(enabled by default).

# 2 channel audio
dtoverlay=pwm-2chan,pin=18,func=2,pin2=13,func2=4

# 1 channel audio
dtoverlay=pwm,pin=18,func=2

Update: Image file updated to 7z format to shrink the size. Most zip programs can extract it just fine. Otherwise just download 7z.

Products you might be interested with:

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RetroPie/Raspberry Pi: How to Configure a USB Sound Device

Step 1

Plug in your usb sound adapter/device into the Raspberry Pi’s usb port and let’s make sure it’s detected. Enter the following command.

pi@retropie:~ $ lsusb

You should get something like

Bus 001 Device 005: ID 0079:0011 DragonRise Inc. Gamepad
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 7392:7711 Edimax Technology Co., Ltd EW-7711UTn nLite Wireless Adapter [Ralink RT2870]
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 08bb:2704 Texas Instruments Audio Codec
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 1a40:0101 Terminus Technology Inc. 4-Port HUB
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
pi@retropie:~ $

Mine is detected as “Bus 001 Device 003: ID 08bb:2704 Texas Instruments Audio Codec“.

Step 2

Type and enter the following command to check the list of sound device being used by the system and take note of the order number.

pi@retropie:~ $ cat /proc/asound/modules

You should get something like

0 snd_bcm2835
1 snd_usb_audio
pi@retropie:~ $

My usb sound adapter is on order number 1.

Step 3

Let’s change the default sound to “1 snd_usb_audio” by editing

pi@retropie:~ $ sudo nano /etc/asound.conf

Paste the following

pcm.!default {
type hw
card 1
}
ctl.!default {
type hw
card 1
}

Reboot and it should use the usb sound as the default.

Sound Test

Enter the following command to test the left and right audio channel:

speaker-test -c2 -twav -l7

You should hear a sound coming from the left and right channel.

=> Pinout Diagrams for the PCM2704 and 3D Sound(COB) USB Sound Card Adapters.

You can also use another method at RetroPie: Configure USB Audio As Primary Sound Device.